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Editorial Results (free)

1. Democrats propose spending trillions fighting climate change -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic presidential candidates are releasing their plans to address climate change ahead of a series of town halls on the issue as the party's base increasingly demands aggressive action.

2. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for second quarter 2019 -

Top residential real estate sales, second quarter 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

3. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for June 2019 -

Top commercial real estate sales, June 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

4. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for June 2019 -

Top residential real estate sales, June 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

5. Joe Biden's $5T climate plan: Net zero emissions by 2050 -

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden is pitching a $5 trillion-plus climate proposal that he says would lead the U.S. to net zero emission of carbon pollution by 2050.

The former vice president calls for $1.7 trillion in federal spending over 10 years, with the rest of the investments coming from the private sector. Biden proposes covering the taxpayer costs by repealing the corporate tax cuts that President Donald Trump signed in 2017, while eliminating existing subsidies to the fossil fuel companies.

6. 2020 Democrats court young voters, but will they show up? -

GRINNELL, Iowa (AP) — Austin Anderson was excited to see Beto O'Rourke on his college campus last week, intrigued by his "character" and talk of bipartisanship. But would he support the former Texas congressman in next year's Iowa caucuses?

7. We should reach out to Nashvilles in other states -

Some facts about Nashville that might surprise you:

• It used to be unofficially known as “Hell’s Valley,” for reasons lost to history, but that name came to be thought of as inappropriate for a place consisting largely of Baptists.

8. How hard can it be to find the perfect church? -

“Church shopping” sounds slightly off-putting. So, I prefer to think of my current repatriated Nashvillian process as spiritual home seeking.

I began with certain parameters, based on geography and beliefs. Google Maps advises there are four churches within a seven-minute walk of my downtown apartment, the closest just five minutes away.

9. Legislators work all the angles for leadership posts -

With apologies to Robert Zimmerman, “the times they are a-changing.” Unlike Bob Dylan’s 1964 song of rebellion, Capitol Hill isn’t turning into a hotbed of liberals, although someday the first could be last. In fact, it could turn more conservative this fall before things take a different direction.

10. East meets west as 2 legislators run out of time -

It wasn’t quite a constitutional crisis, but when Reps. Micah Van Huss and Joe Towns start teaming up, something is amiss.

Van Huss, a Republican from East Tennessee near Johnson City, and Towns, a Democrat from Memphis, are typically like water and oil. But on the final day of the 110th General Assembly, when they felt the Senate slow-walked and spiked their constitutional amendments, they suddenly became bosom buddies, forgetting they were on opposite sides of the argument over Memphis and removal of Confederate monuments.

11. Davy Crockett’s fine, but let’s not get carried away -

The Tennessee General Assembly is making some monumental decisions these days – literally. Not only is the Legislature prepared to put a statue of Tennessee folk hero Davy Crockett in front of the State Capitol, replacing obscure Nashville politician Edward Carmack, it’s also likely to erect a monument, or memorial, to unborn children in the ongoing battle against abortion.

12. Legislators file 4 bills to protect Civil War monuments -

Legislative battles are looming over a spate of bills designed to hammer Memphis and any other cities accused of violating the Tennessee Heritage Protection Act.

Lawmakers filed several pieces of legislation aimed at punishing local governments in the wake of the Memphis City Council move to topple the Nathan Bedford Forrest statue in Health Sciences Park and two other Confederate monuments in another park by selling the property to a newly-created nonprofit organization.

13. A long-shot solution for guns in Cordell Hull -

State Rep. Joe Towns was like a lot of other legislators when he arrived at the renovated Cordell Hull Building for the start of the 2018 legislative session.

The Memphis Democrat knew the Legislature’s top leaders had set policy allowing carry-permit holders to bring weapons into the renovated building, but he wasn’t enthused by any stretch of the imagination. Towns wasn’t happy, either, when he saw Tennessee Highway Patrol security at the new building being supplemented by a private company, Allied Universal.

14. Despite massive turnover, GOP owns legislature -

2018 will be a year of change for the Tennessee General Assembly, and 2019 will bring even more, especially in leadership – much depending on the popularity of President Donald Trump.

Not only is the Legislature moving to the Cordell Hull Building, vacating the Legislative Plaza after 45 years or so, a number of legislative faces are changing, too, even before next year’s election.

15. Fitzhugh's K-12 bill passes House will have to wait a year in Senate -

House Minority Leader Craig Fitzhugh pushed his K-12 education fund to passage Tuesday, but the possibility of funding and Senate approval will have to wait until 2018.

Dubbed the “K-12 Block Grant Act,” the measure calls for setting aside $250 million in excess state revenue for interest-generating investment to provide grant money for school systems statewide. Each system could use the funds for state-approved programs such as reading coaches or dual enrollment, items not funded through Tennessee’s Basic Education Program.

16. Thursday's acrimony is Friday lovefest: House passes $37B budget -

Putting a day of acrimony behind it, the House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed a $37 billion budget plan, stripping away nearly $320 million in amendments placed on it the previous day.

Compared to the previous day of arguments and overspending, Friday’s debate was a veritable lovefest.

17. Forrest kerfuffle might be sign of bigger problem -

Legislation that slipped through the House of Representatives honoring an unknown author who penned a Nathan Bedford Forrest apologist biography was enabled by the climate within the Republican-controlled body, a Memphis legislator says.

18. Bill to change state Constitution's wording on slavery gets boost -

Rep. Joe Towns’ legislation to change the state Constitution’s wording on slavery is being postponed until 2018, but it picked up a key endorsement Monday from Republican House Majority Leader Glen Casada.

19. Resolution honoring Klan leader denounced as 'underhanded' -

Memphis lawmakers blasted a Smyrna legislator Thursday morning, accusing him of violating their honor system by sliding a resolution through the House honoring an author they perceive as a Nathan Bedford Forrest apologist.

20. Tennessee lawmakers give final approval to Haslam's roads bill -

Wrapping up wide-ranging legislation that dominated the opening year of the 110th General Assembly, the House concurred Monday with the Senate’s IMPROVE Act, inserting a $7 million measure to increase property tax breaks for veterans.

21. Transcript of AP interview with Trump -

A transcript of an Oval Office interview Friday with President Donald Trump by AP White House Correspondent Julie Pace. Where the audio recording of the interview is unclear, ellipses or a notation that the recording was unintelligible are used.

22. Tennessee House, Senate pass Haslam's gas tax proposal -

The House and Senate are nearly ready to send the IMPROVE Act to Gov. Bill Haslam, passing it with relatively wide voting margins after months of debate.

Only one adjustment is needed in a measure providing property tax relief for veterans, the disabled and elderly before the measure can be sent to Haslam.

23. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for January 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, January 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

24. Towns: Junk food bill shows Butts has 'lost her damn mind' -

State Rep. Joe Towns Jr. isn’t surprised that Rep. Sheila Butt dropped her bill limiting “junk food” for food stamp recipients.

“She should because she’s lost her damn mind,” Towns, a Memphis Democrat, said Tuesday. “How are you going to put out a bill to tell people what they can and can’t eat?”

25. Why is it so hard for our state to oust indicted politicians? -

Tennessee is lagging much of the nation when it comes to the ability to remove scoundrels from public office.

And, make no mistake, the Volunteer State has had its fair share of ne’er-do-well politicians who would likely have been thrown out of office if the proper procedures had been in place.

26. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for first quarter 2016 -

Top residential real estate sales, first quarter 2016, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

27. Did ‘people back home’ really sway no votes on Bible? -

I thought about skipping church Sunday and playing golf. After listening to the House of Representatives’ debate on the Bible bill, I could probably skip church for a month and still be in good standing.

28. Senate poised to do real damage via de-annexation -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland makes a persuasive argument against de-annexation legislation now being considered by the state Legislature, providing a long list of figures to show it would devastate the Bluff City.

29. Solving problems at Brentwood's B&C Hardware, 1 ‘thingamajig’ at a time -

Pushing at the bridge of his spectacles – with lenses that transition from clear to dark depending on the light – the 60-year-old, who likes to ratchet folks’ woes down to the basic nuts and bolts, looks toward the paint counter near the doorway of B&C Ace Hardware.

30. Lovingly baked: Slice of heaven in Berry Hill -

Thick coffee and baked pie aromas mingling inside the tidy building signal I’ve found perfect refuge from the storms of life. All the damned snow. And then the cold rain. Waiting for the sun.

31. Black Caucus demanding changes to Achievement School District -

NASHVILLE – The Legislature’s Black Caucus – led by Memphis members – has its sights set squarely on the Achievement School District, either eliminating it or putting it on hold until major improvements are made.

32. Is state takeover of troubled schools a $100M failure? -

Armed with a Vanderbilt University study showing Shelby County schools that were taken over by the state’s Achievement School District are showing little to no improvement, Memphis legislators are nearly ready to kill the experiment.

33. GM, government actions questioned in car fire recalls -

DETROIT (AP) — Shortly after Elizabeth Berry parked her bright yellow 2003 Chevrolet Monte Carlo SS on the street in front of her family's home in May 2014, flames engulfed the engine, destroying the car and scorching her mailbox.

34. Higher density translates to more tax revenue -

Adding higher-density development can be a difficult pill to swallow for longtime residents of a city, town or neighborhood residents.

More people packed into a small space can potentially mean more issues such as noise, traffic, crime and strain on public services.

35. Saggy pants bill headed to governor -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Supporters of a proposal that would prohibit students from dressing in an "indecent manner" at school say they would like to revisit the measure should it become law and make it stricter.

36. Saggy pants proposal advancing in House -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Students would be prohibited from having saggy pants on school grounds under a proposal advancing in the House.

The measure sponsored by Rep. Joe Towns passed the House Education Committee on a voice vote on Tuesday.

37. Ban on students showing underwear advances -

NASHVILLE (AP) - A Tennessee lawmaker who didn't get a lot of traction with a "pull your pants up" bill has come back with another proposal.

A House subcommittee on Wednesday approved Memphis Democrat Joe Towns' proposal that would prohibit any students from showing their underwear in the way they dress. WPLN radio (http://bit.ly/ApllST ) reported the measure would require female student athletes to wear shirts over sports bras.

38. Bill to ban truck stops near neighborhoods fails -

NASHVILLE (AP) - A bill to ban truck stops within a half-mile of neighborhoods in Nashville and Memphis has failed.

The House State and Local Government Subcommittee on Wednesday voted 5-2 against the bill sponsored by Rep. Joe Towns. The Memphis Democrat argued that truck stops attract drugs, prostitution and other activities that could hurt home prices and be undesirable to communities.

39. Top residential real estate transactions for November 2011 -

Top residential sales for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford and Wilson counties for November 2011 compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on-line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.