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VOL. 40 | NO. 16 | Friday, April 15, 2016

Aim high: How to reach C-Level decision makers

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Getting a meeting with C-level decision makers is no easy task, but it can be done. As with any true success, it all starts with doing your homework.

First, target the right organizations. Make a list of 10 to 20 companies that would make an ideal customer.

Once you do, you will want to spend some time researching those businesses. Use any online resource you can, from the website to social media to business journals.

Try searching “company name + vice president” on the web to find key leadership team members. Conduct advanced searches on LinkedIn.

Also search the company name on Google News. Sometimes there will be recent articles about company information or leadership changes. You can use all of this to determine what value you can offer the prospect.

Next, you’ll want to craft a script or at least a brief outline for the call.

Executives do not want to hear a breakdown of your company’s products or services.

You should always keep the focus on their company and how you can improve their bottom line. You need to be able to speak to them in their language with a focus on strategy and ROI.

C-level executives expect you to be an expert in your field. If they are going to hire you, they need to know they can trust you to be the subject matter expert in sales, marketing, public relations or whatever you are selling.

You should go into the call extremely confident that you can solve a problem, help them with a pain point or give them a competitive advantage. You should exude confidence.

For example, when leaving a voicemail, always speak from a position of authority.

“I was just wondering if you might be interested in…” is not nearly as strong as the simple, “I wanted to talk about…”

Understand that it takes time to reach key decision makers within a company. Sometimes it’s because they are busy running the company, and sometimes they are just very well-guarded.

So plan on making possibly six or more attempts.

When calling an executive, be sure you get the administrative assistant’s name. Strike up small conversations because you’ll most likely need their help.

After you’ve tried several times to reach the executive, try enlisting the assistant’s help in setting a meeting.

There is way too much competition out there to think you can simply put up a good website or send out a brochure and these companies will come to you.

You must be dogged in your pursuit, do your homework and always be prepared. If you do these things, odds are you won’t only land a meeting; you may end up with a new client.

Charles Vance, Account Strategist at RedRover Sales & Marketing Strategy, can be reached at www.redrovercompany.com.

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