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VOL. 43 | NO. 43 | Friday, October 25, 2019

Leaving it all on the field with football analogies

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1027B Battery Lane

With football season devouring the minds and souls of the Midstate, it is interesting to try to gain knowledge from the brain trusts – aka head coaches – who impart words of wisdom throughout the season.

In listening to the brilliance imparted by these deans of the gridiron, there are several factors that are consistent in the assessments of what must happen in order to win football games.

Somehow, these must be adapted to the housing market, listings in particular.

• Protect the football. In housing, it is important that the house be protected during the marketing period. The houses should be cleaned every day and ready to show. Additionally, insurance policies should be evaluated in case one of the people viewing the house should perform an illegal procedure or commit a personal foul that might result in injure.

• Eliminate penalties. Houses are penalized by potential buyers for too many men on the field, or in the house. Sellers should not be present during showings. There are also flags thrown for too many appliances on the counter, too many family photos on the walls and too much stuff in general. Illegal blocks can be called on furniture that disrupts the flow of a house, which is often referred to as a neutral zone infraction.

• Special teams play is important. The Realtor representing the home should have the team prepared for the game with a plan that includes photography, staging, title work, inspections, repairs, showing instructions and cosmetic touchup.

• Make plays. This one always gets me. The members of a football team are called players. That in itself should suggest that they make plays, yet today’s football coaches mention this in every interview.

Houses must sell, and that requires a team effort.

And to quote Yogi Berra, “It ain’t over till it’s over.” Many houses have to go under contract numerous times in order to close.

Sale of the Week

Newcomers to Nashville are often baffled by the streets and addresses, as many thoroughfares change names in midstream, like when West End becomes Harding Road in front of Montgomery Bell Academy for no apparent reason.

Then Harding Road, or Pike, if you will, continues until it splits and becomes Highway 70 or Highway 100.

Another example comes from Harding Place, not to be confused with Harding Road (Pike), although Harding Place does terminate at Harding Road (Pike), just before its dissolution into the aforementioned highways.

A traveler headed east on Harding Place will eventually cross Granny White Pike. There, Harding Place changes to Battery Lane and remains so until it hits Franklin Road, now Franklin Pike. Past Franklin Pike, it becomes Harding Place again.

During the Civil War, or War Between the States, there was a battery assembled nearby, and the street pays homage to said battery.

Once the traveler lands upon the hallowed Battery Lane, there is a cove to be found. That inlet being Battery Cove, a man-made secluded and gated community. Battery Cove was developed by Boulevard Homes, a company founded in 2010 by Matt Beata, who will build on boulevards, coves, streets, avenues or any other path taken or not.

The listing agent for the home located at 1027B Battery Lane is Kathy Beata, who described the property as being located in a luxury four-home development. The Boulevard Homes website tells us yet another Beata, this being Jim Beata, is the chief of operations. Sly Stone would recognize the company as a “Family Affair.”

The house includes Wolf and Sub-Zero appliances along with energy efficiency throughout the home with insulated windows, programmable thermostat and tankless water heater. The Beata family uses low-VOC paints.

Many homebuyers are now demanding the use of low-VOC (volatile organic chemicals) in building materials. Until recently, most paints, varnish, lacquers and other sealants used in home construction were high-VOC.

These materials have a high vapor pressure allowing them to evaporate from liquid to solid and enter the air where they can be inhaled by any breathing creature in the area.

In Battery Cove, the house at 1027B brought a $2 million sales price, a number seldom heard of for an alpha numeric address.

Susan Cann with Century 21 Premier represented the buyer in the transaction who can breathe easier now living in a low-VOC home.

Richard Courtney is a licensed real estate broker with Fridrich and Clark Realty and can be reached at richard@richardcourtney.com.

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