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Editorial Results (free)

1. Stocks closing mixed after new signs of cooling inflation -

NEW YORK (AP) — An afternoon pullback left stock indexes on Wall Street mixed, erasing most of their morning gains fueled by another encouraging report about inflation. The S&P 500 closed 0.1% lower Thursday.

2. US key 30-year mortgage rate jumps back over 5%, now 5.22% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term U.S. mortgage rates soared this week in a continued volatile market as the key 30-year loan rate jumped back over 5%.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac reports that the 30-year rate rose to 5.22% from 4.99% last week. By contrast, the rate stood at 2.87% a year ago.

3. US unemployment claims rise by 14,000 to 262,000 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans who signed up for unemployment benefits rose last week to the highest level since November, though the U.S. job market continues to show signs of strength.

4. US wholesale inflation fell in July for 1st time in 2 years -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Prices at the wholesale level fell from June to July, the first month-to-month drop in more than two years and a sign that some of the U.S. economy's inflationary pressures cooled last month.

5. EXPLAINER: Mixed US inflation signs. Where are prices going? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Consumers struggling with skyrocketing prices for food, gas, autos and rent got a tantalizing hint of relief last month, when prices didn't budge at all from June after 25 straight months of increases. With gas prices continuing to fall, inflation is probably slowing further this month.

6. Wall Street hits 3-month high as inflation cools -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks rallied to three-month highs on Wall Street Wednesday as investors welcomed a government report showing that inflation cooled more than expected last month.

The encouraging inflation update sparked speculation that the Federal Reserve may not have to remain as aggressive about hiking interest rates as feared. The central bank has been raising rates in an effort to slow the economy in the hopes of stamping out inflation, but that risks bringing on a recession if the Fed moves too aggressively.

7. Three ways to fight against inflation, win the long game -

Inflation is scary. Groceries, gas, airfare, car purchases, utilities: In so many areas, your buying power is shrinking as prices continue to rise.

Fear can make you want to do something – anything! – to fight back. Thankfully, many of the best moves to counteract inflation align beautifully with time-tested money management practices. Here are three areas where smart strategies become even smarter when prices are rising.

8. Five new vehicles that are easy on the wallet -

New cars are pricier than ever with inflation, low inventory and now rising interest rates taking a toll on prices.

Last week, Federal Reserve raised interest rates for the fourth time this year, compounding the issues that plague car shoppers.

9. Harbinger of normalcy: ‘Open house, 2-4 Sunday’ -

Things have changed. Realtors have begun to incorporate the “price improvement” verbiage into their vocabularies and their postings, and many of the nearly 2,000 new Realtors in the area are venturing into uncharted waters with a sales technique known as “open houses.”

10. Lower prices offer Americans slight reprieve from inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Falling prices for gas, airline tickets and clothes gave Americans a little bit of relief last month, though overall inflation is still running at close to its highest level in four decades.

11. Wall Street slips as weak earnings hit tech, travel stocks -

Stocks are closing lower on Wall Street as disappointing earnings reports weighed on technology and travel companies.

The S&P 500 fell 0.4%, while the Dow Jones Industrial Average and the Nasdaq also slipped Tuesday afternoon.

12. US inflation will likely stay high even as gas prices fall -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans may finally be catching a break from relentlessly surging prices — if just a slight one — even as inflation is expected to remain painfully high for months.

Thanks largely to falling gas prices, the government's inflation report for July, to be released Wednesday morning, is expected to show that prices jumped 8.7% from a year earlier — still a sizzling pace but a slowdown from the 9.1% year-over-year figure in June, which was the highest in four decades.

13. Wall Street falls as jobs data suggests Fed hikes not over -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are closing mostly lower Friday after new data on the hot U.S. jobs market suggested the Fed won't soon rein in its aggressive rate hikes. The S&P 500 is down 0.2% and the Nasdaq lost 0.5%, while the Dow Jones industrials notched a small gain. Employers unexpectedly accelerated their hiring last month and added hundreds of thousands more jobs than forecast. While the data suggests the economy may not be in a recession, it also undercuts investor hopes that inflation may be close to peaking. Treasury yields jumped. Warner Bros. Discovery had its third worst day ever after recording weak second quarter results.

14. 5 key takeaways from the July jobs report -

NEW YORK (AP) — July's jobs report was a stunner, in more ways than one. Despite raging inflation and anxiety about a possible recession, employers created 528,000 jobs last month, more than double market expectations. That's the fastest pace of hiring since February.

15. EXPLAINER: How do we know when a recession has begun? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy has contracted for two straight quarters, intensifying fears that the nation is on the cusp of a recession — if not already in one — barely two years after the pandemic recession officially ended.

16. 'What recession?': US employers add 528,000 jobs in July -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers added an astonishing 528,000 jobs last month despite flashing warning signs of an economic downturn, easing fears of a recession and handing President Joe Biden some good news heading into the midterm elections.

17. As recession fears grow, strong US hiring is likely slowing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The American job market has defied raging inflation, rising interest rates, growing recession fears. Month after month, U.S. employers just kept adding hundreds of thousands of workers, often beating forecasters' expectations.

18. Long-term mortgage rates less than 5% for 1st time in 4 months -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The average long-term U.S. mortgage rate fell below 5% for the first time in four months, days after the Federal Reserve jacked up its main borrowing rate in an aggressive effort to get inflation under control.

19. Employment market shows signs of cooling amid rate hikes -

NEW YORK (AP) — The employment market appears to have lost some of its sizzle, a development that could influence Federal Reserve policy and further raise concerns about an economic recession among investors.

20. Bank of England predicts recession at the end of the year -

LONDON (AP) — The Bank of England projected Thursday that the United Kingdom's economy will enter a recession at the end of the year as it hiked interest rates by the largest amount in more than 27 years, pushing to tame accelerating inflation driven by the fallout from Russia's war in Ukraine.

21. Applications for US jobless claims up again last week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More Americans applied for jobless benefits last week as the number of unemployed continues to rise modestly, though the labor market remains one of the strongest parts of the U.S. economy.

22. Freije from long range: Rates will remain stable -

This week’s mortgage interest rate news is provided by Matt Freije, branch manager and vice president of mortgage lending with Guaranteed Rate Mortgage. Many may recognize the name as Freije was as an All-SEC basketball player for Vanderbilt and was the school’s all-time leading scorer when he graduated in 2004.

23. Takeaways: Abortion backlash in Kansas, Greitens' collapse -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In one of the biggest days of this year's primary campaign season, voters rejected a measure that would have made it easier to restrict abortion rights in red-state Kansas and repudiated a scandal-tarred former governor seeking a U.S. Senate seat in Missouri.

24. Robinhood cuts 23% of its workforce as fewer users trade -

NEW YORK (AP) — Robinhood Markets said Tuesday it's cutting nearly a quarter of its workforce, as crashing cryptocurrency prices and a turbulent stock market keep more customers off its trading app.

25. Wall Street closes lower after another day of mixed trading -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are closing lower as Wall Street's modest August retreat continued another day.

Stocks wavered over the day as investors are unsure whether the market's strong run in July is the start of a turnaround or a temporary blip.

26. Treasury says borrowing needs increased by $262 billion -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Treasury Department is seeking to borrow $444 billion in the current quarter through September as the Federal Reserve tightens its portfolio.

Figures released Monday by the department show that to be a $262 billion increase compared to estimates announced in May, a sign that the federal government will need to be more reliant on debt.

27. Dems seem headed for climate, health win after ups and downs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's been more than a year in the making and has seen plenty of ups and downs. Now, a Democratic economic package focused on climate and health care faces hurdles but seems headed toward party-line passage by Congress next month.

28. Stocks rally again, close out best month since Nov. 2020 -

Stocks racked up more gains Friday as Wall Street closed out its best month since November 2020, a welcome breather for investors after a punishing year for the market.

The S&P 500 index, a benchmark for many stock funds, rose 1.4% and finished 9.1% higher for July. A rebound in technology stocks, big retailers and other companies that rely on direct consumer spending helped power the index's broad gains this month. The index is still down 13.3% for the year.

29. Inflation and wage data suggest US prices will keep climbing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation surged in June and workers' average wages accelerated in the spring — signs that Americans won't likely feel any relief from rising prices anytime soon and that the Federal Reserve will feel compelled to further raise borrowing costs.

30. Apple still thriving as economy slows, despite 3Q profit dip -

BERKELEY, Calif. (AP) — Apple's profit slipped during the past quarter, but the world's largest technology company is holding up better than many of its peers as the economy teeters on the edge of a recession.

31. EXPLAINER: How do we know when a recession has begun? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy has contracted for two straight quarters, intensifying fears that the nation is on the cusp of a recession — if not already in one — barely two years after the pandemic recession officially ended.

32. Gov't: US Bank workers opened fake accounts for sales goals -

NEW YORK (AP) — For more than a decade, US Bank pressured its employees to open fake accounts in their customers' names in order to meet unrealistic sales goals, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said Thursday, in a case that is deeply similar to the sales practices scandal uncovered at Wells Fargo last decade.

33. Fewer Americans applied for jobless benefits last week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Fewer Americans applied for jobless benefits last week, but the previous week's number was revised upward significantly, with claims breaching the 250,000 level in back-to-back weeks for the first time in more than eight months.

34. Average US long-term mortgage rates retreat to 5.3% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term U.S. mortgage rates retreated this week just as the Federal Reserve announced another big rate hike in its bid to get four-decade high inflation under control.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac reported Thursday that the 30-year rate fell back to 5.3% from 5.54% last week. One year ago the average 30-year rate was 2.8%.

35. US not yet in recession and 4 other takeaways from the Fed -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Jerome Powell delivered a tough message at the start of a news conference Wednesday: Inflation is way too high, and the Federal Reserve is laser-focused on taming it with higher borrowing costs.

36. US economy shrinks for a 2nd quarter, raising recession fear -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy shrank from April through June for a second straight quarter, contracting at a 0.9% annual pace and raising fears that the nation may be approaching a recession.

37. Best Buy cuts sales forecast as inflation tempers spending -

NEW YORK (AP) — Best Buy, the nation's largest consumer electronics chain, cut its annual sales and profit forecast Wednesday, citing surging inflation that has dampened consumer spending on gadgets.

38. Watchdog head: Fines may not stop bad behavior by companies -

NEW YORK (AP) — The head of the nation's financial watchdog is having second thoughts about how useful fines are in deterring illegal behavior in the financial industry, saying some companies have gotten so big that the money makes little difference.

39. Wall Street closes higher after new Fed rate hike, earnings -

Stocks on Wall Street are closing solidly higher Wednesday after the Federal Reserve ratcheted up its campaign against surging inflation by raising its key interest rate three-quarters of a point.

40. How the Federal Reserve's rate hikes affect your finances -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Higher mortgage rates have sent home sales tumbling. Credit card rates have grown more burdensome, and so have auto loans. Savers are finally receiving yields that are actually visible, while crypto assets are reeling.

41. Fed unleashes another big rate hike in bid to curb inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve on Wednesday raised its benchmark interest rate by a hefty three-quarters of a point for a second straight time in its most aggressive drive in three decades to tame high inflation.

42. Google's parent reports slowest quarterly growth in 2 years -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Google's revenue growth during the past quarter decelerated to its slowest pace in two years as advertisers reined in their spending amid intensifying fears of an economic recession.

43. EXPLAINER: How do we know when a recession has begun? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — By one common definition, the U.S. economy is on the cusp of a recession. Yet that definition isn't the one that counts.

On Thursday, when the government estimates the gross domestic product for the April-June period, some economists think it may show that the economy shrank for a second straight quarter. That would meet a longstanding assumption for when a recession has begun.

44. Biden fights talk of recession as key economic report looms -

Facing a potentially grim report this week on the economy's overall health, President Joe Biden wants to convince a skeptical public that the U.S. is not, in fact, heading into a recession.

The Commerce Department on Thursday will release new gross domestic product figures. Top forecasts such as the Atlanta Federal Reserve's GDPNow are predicting that the figure will be negative for the second straight quarter — an informal signal that the country is stuck in a downturn. That's political chum for Republicans in an election year.

45. US economy sending mixed signals: Here's what it all means -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy is caught in an awkward, painful place. A confusing one, too.

Growth appears to be sputtering, home sales are tumbling and economists warn of a potential recession ahead. But consumers are still spending, businesses keep posting profits and the economy keeps adding hundreds of thousands of jobs each month.

46. Consumers confidence slides for third straight month in July -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. consumer confidence slid again in July higher prices for food, gas and just about everything else continued to weigh on Americans.

The Conference Board said Tuesday that its consumer confidence index fell to 95.7 in July from 98.4 in June, largely due to consumer anxiety over the current economic conditions, particularly four-decade high inflation. It's the lowest reading since February of 2021.

47. Walmart cuts profit outlook as shoppers adapt to inflation -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart Inc. on Monday lowered its profit outlook for the second quarter and the full year, saying rising prices on food and gas are forcing shoppers to cut back on discretionary items, particularly clothing, that carry higher profit margins.

48. Stocks closing mixed; Investors brace for Fed meeting -

Stocks are closing mixed Monday, as investors brace for a two-day meeting of the Federal Reserve this week.

The nation's central bank is expected to raise interest rates sharply to combat inflation.

49. Fed set to impose another big rate hike to fight inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Conflicting signs about the health of the U.S. economy have thrust the Federal Reserve into a difficult spot.

With inflation raging at a four-decade high, the job market strong and consumer spending still solid, the Fed is under pressure to raise interest rates aggressively.

50. Yellen downplays US recession risk as economic reports loom -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen on Sunday said the U.S. economy is slowing but pointed to healthy hiring as proof that it is not yet in recession.

Yellen spoke on NBC's "Meet the Press" just before a slew of economic reports will be released this week that will shed light on an economy currently besieged by rampant inflation and threatened by higher interest rates. The data will cover sales of new homes, consumer confidence, incomes, spending, inflation, and overall output.

51. Wall Street slumps, still marks best weekly gain in a month -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street gave back some of its strong gains from the week on Friday following discouraging readings on the global economy and another slew of profit reports from big U.S. companies. The S&P 500 lost nearly 1%, ending a three-day rally that had carried it back to its highest level since early June. The Nasdaq led the market lower with a drop of almost 2% following weaker-than-expected profit reports from tech-oriented companies. The Dow Jones Industrial Average held up better, in large part because constituent American Express gave an encouraging earnings report. Treasury yields slumped.

52. Stocks end higher as Wall Street's winning week rolls on -

Stocks on Wall Street closed higher Thursday, building on their winning week, as investors sifted through a deluge of news about the economy, interest rates and corporate profits.

The S&P 500 rose 1% after shaking off an early stumble, returning to its highest level in six weeks. The Dow Jones Industrial Average also recovered from a midafternoon slide to end 0.5% higher, while the Nasdaq composite rose 1.4% as Tesla and technology stocks led the market.

53. Average long-term US mortgage rates edge up to 5.54% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term U.S. mortgage rates ticked up again this week in a rapidly cooling housing market as the Federal Reserve gears up for what could be yet another bump to its benchmark interest rate.

54. Americans filing jobless claims at highest level in 8 months -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits last week rose to the highest level in more than eight months in what may be a sign that the labor market is weakening.

55. Europe's central bank joins global push for higher rates -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — The European Central Bank raised interest rates Thursday for the first time in 11 years, joining steps already taken by the U.S. Federal Reserve and other major central banks but raising new questions about whether the rush to make credit more expensive will plunge major economies into recession at the price of fighting inflation.

56. Housing market chills as mortgage rates, prices scare buyers -

NEW YORK (AP) — It's the summer that cooled off the housing market.

Rising mortgage rates have combined with already high home prices to discourage would-be buyers. Mortgage applications have declined sharply. Sales of previously occupied homes have fallen for five straight months, during what is generally the busiest time of year in real estate.

57. Wall Street closes higher, adding to gains after big rally -

A choppy day on Wall Street ended with more gains for stocks Wednesday, as investors welcomed another batch of encouraging profit reports from U.S. companies.

The S&P 500 rose 0.6%, tacking more onto its big gains from a day earlier, when the benchmark index soared 2.8%, its best day in weeks.

58. US home sales fell in June as prices reach new heights -

Sales of previously occupied U.S. homes slowed for the fifth consecutive month in June as higher mortgage rates and rising prices kept many home hunters on the sidelines.

Existing home sales fell 5.4% last month from May to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.12 million, the National Association of Realtors said Wednesday.

59. Stocks sweep higher on Wall Street as profit reports roll in -

The stock market had its best day in more than three weeks Tuesday as more companies reported how much profit they made during the spring.

The S&P 500 climbed 2.8% after a powerful tide carried 99% of the stocks in the index higher. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 2.4% and the Nasdaq composite roared 3.1% higher.

60. Big truck, big bucks and other real estate fallacies -

In residential real estate, there are presumptions and assumptions made by buyers and sellers that are not accurate. In fact, they are just plain wrong.

One of the best is that when either party decides that the other party is wealthy and decides no financial concessions should be made.

61. Earnings slide ongoing for banks; BofA Q2 profit dips 32% -

NEW YORK (AP) — Bank of America's second quarter profits fell 32%, the latest major U.S. bank to report a dip in earnings after a strong 2021.

A better reflection of performance at the country's second largest bank this quarter was revenue, which increased from $21.5 billion, to $22.7 billion year over year, largely due to higher interest rates and an increased level of lending.

62. GM's Barra stands by ambitious EV pledge -

NEW YORK (AP) — The economy is a bit wobbly, but General Motors CEO Mary Barra isn't backing off of an audacious prediction: By the middle of this decade, her company will sell more electric vehicles in the U.S. than Tesla, the global sales leader.

63. Wells Fargo profit falls buy loan growth buoys investors -

Wells Fargo, the nation's largest mortgage lender, saw its second-quarter revenue and profit decline as rising interest rates pushed people out of the housing market.

The San Francisco bank earned $3.1 billion in the period, or 74 cents per share, coming up short of the 80 cents per share forecast by analysts surveyed by data provider FactSet. Revenue was $17 billion, down 16% from last year and below the $17.5 billion Wall Street projected. The bank had revenue of $20.3 billion and earnings per share of $1.38 in the same period a year ago.

64. Biden tells Dems to quickly pass pared-down economic package -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden seemed to bow Friday to Sen. Joe Manchin's demand for a slimmed-down economic package, telling Democrats to quickly push the measure through Congress so families could "sleep easier" and enjoy the health care savings it proposes.

65. Fed ethics inquiry clears Powell and Clarida trades -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve's inspector general concluded Thursday that financial trades made several years ago by Chair Jerome Powell and Richard Clarida, then the vice chair, did not violate any laws or ethics rules.

66. Stocks fall as JPMorgan warning helps send banks lower -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks closed broadly lower on Wall Street Thursday as JPMorgan Chase opened the latest round of corporate earnings for big banks with weak results and a warning about the economy.

Wall Street is also assessing the latest government reports showing that inflation remains hot and shows no signs of cooling, even as central banks try to loosen its grip on businesses and consumers by hiking interest rates.

67. Fed board member opens door to 1-point hike if demand rises -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Christopher Waller, a member of the Federal Reserve's Board of Governors, said Thursday that he would be open to supporting a huge 1 percentage point increase in the Fed's key short-term interest rate later this month if upcoming economic data points to robust consumer spending.

68. Average long-term US mortgage rates bounce back up to 5.51% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term U.S. mortgage rates were back up this week, just as the latest government data shows inflation has not slowed, meaning the Federal Reserve is almost certain to raise its benchmark borrowing rate later this month.

69. US weekly jobless claims at highest point in nearly 8 months -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits last week hit its highest level in nearly 8 months, but the total number of those collecting benefits fell.

Applications for jobless aid for the week ending July 9 rose by 9,000 to 244,000, up from the previous week's 235,000, the Labor Department reported Thursday. First-time applications generally reflect layoffs. Analysts had expected the number to remain flat from the previous week.

70. Wholesale inflation in June surged 11.3% from a year ago -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation at the wholesale level climbed 11.3% in June compared with a year earlier, the latest painful reminder that inflation is running hot through the American economy.

The Labor Department reported Thursday that the U.S. producer price index — which measures inflation before it hits consumers — rose at the fastest pace since hitting a record 11.6% in March.

71. Senate approves Michael Barr to Federal Reserve post -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate easily approved Michael Barr to be the Federal Reserve's top banking regulator in a bipartisan vote Wednesday.

72. JPMorgan 2Q profit drops; CEO warns of economic challenges -

NEW YORK (AP) — Profits at JPMorgan Chase fell by 28% in the second quarter as the bank tries to navigate an economy that's showing strength in many areas but losing steam as interest rates continue to rise, hitting consumers and corporations alike.

73. Stocks end lower as Wall Street braces for big hike in rates -

Stocks capped another shaky day on Wall Street with more losses Wednesday, after a highly anticipated report on inflation turned out to be even worse than expected.

The S&P 500 ended 0.4% lower, its fourth consecutive drop, after tumbling as much as 1.6% earlier. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 0.7%, while the Nasdaq composite dropped 0.2%, erasing nearly all of an early 2.1% loss.

74. EXPLAINER: Why US inflation is so high, and when it may ease -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation's relentless surge didn't merely persist in June. It accelerated.

For the 12 months ending in June, the government's consumer price index rocketed 9.1%, the fastest year-over-year jump since 1981.

75. US inflation surges again in June, raising risks for economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. inflation surged to a new four-decade high in June because of rising prices for gas, food and rent, squeezing household budgets and pressuring the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates aggressively -- trends that raise the risk of a recession.

76. US stocks slide as earnings reports for companies begin -

Stocks shed early gains and ended broadly lower on Wall Street Tuesday as investors brace for a big week of news on inflation and company earnings reports.

The S&P 500 fell 0.9%, extending its losing streak to a third consecutive day. All of the benchmark index's 11 company sectors closed in the red.

77. Rising rates? No problem. Sales numbers still climbing -

After the Federal Reserve announced it had raised interest rates by 75 basis points in June, mortgage interest rates jumped to 5.85% for a fixed-rate, 30-year loan, even though mortgage rates are tied to 10-year Treasury Bills, not the Federal Reserve.

78. US, Japan vow joint efforts on Ukraine, trade, food crisis -

TOKYO (AP) — U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen and Japan's finance minister agreed Tuesday to cooperate in dealing with challenges from the war in Ukraine and promoting free trade, sustainable energy and food security.

79. Stocks slump on Wall Street amid recession, rate worries -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street got back to slumping Monday to kick off a week full of updates about how bad inflation is and how corporate profits are handling it.

The S&P 500 fell 1.2% and gave up the majority of its gains from the prior week. The Dow Jones Industrial Average slipped 0.5%, and the Nasdaq composite dropped 2.3%.

80. Fed's Bullard: Solid US economy can handle rising rates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy is healthy and shows little sign of an imminent recession, and can withstand higher interest rates, St. Louis Federal Reserve president James Bullard said Monday.

81. Wall Street ends winning week with mixed close on jobs data -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street is closing out a winning week with a sputtering finish on Friday, as stocks waffled following a stronger-than-expected report on the U.S. jobs market.

The S&P 500 slipped 0.1% after earlier flipping between a loss of 0.9% and a gain of 0.4%.

82. EXPLAINER: 5 key takeaways from the June jobs report -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation is raging. The stock market is tumbling and interest rates rising. American consumers are depressed and angry. Economists warn of potentially dark times ahead.

But employers? They just keep hiring.

83. A robust June jobs report clouds outlook for US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A strong hiring report for June has assuaged fears that the U.S. economy might be on the cusp of a recession — and highlighted the resilience of the nation's job market.

84. With US dollar nearly equal to euro, impact is being felt -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. dollar has been surging so much that it's nearly equal in value to the euro for the first time in 20 years. That trend, though, threatens to hurt American companies because their goods become more expensive for foreign buyers. If U.S. exports were to weaken as a result, so, too, would the already-slowing U.S. economy.

85. Average long-term US mortgage rates retreat this week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term U.S. mortgage rates eased again this week as the Federal Reserve remains likely to raise its benchmark borrowing rate in its ongoing battle to bring down inflation.

86. Retailers scale back hiring as worry about a slowdown grows -

NEW YORK (AP) — After going on a frenzied hiring spree for a year and a half to meet surging shopper demand, America's retailers are starting to temper their recruiting.

The changing mindset comes as companies confront a pullback in consumer spending, the prospect of an economic downturn and surging labor costs. Some analysts suggest that merchants have also learned to do more with fewer workers.

87. Stocks rise after release of Fed meeting minutes -

Stocks are closing higher on Wall Street Wednesday following the release of minutes from the Federal Reserve's most recent policy meeting. The S&P 500 rose 0.4%, the Dow Jones Industrial Average gained 0.2% and the Nasdaq rose 0.3%. The Russell 2000 index of small company stocks remained in the red, a sign that investors are worried about economic growth. The minutes of the two-day meeting last month show that Fed officials concluded higher interest rates could be needed to restrain what they saw as a worrying trend: consumers starting to anticipate higher inflation. Bond yields rose.

...

88. Fed: Sharply higher rates may be needed to quell inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve officials were concerned at their meeting last month that consumers were increasingly anticipating higher inflation, and they signaled that much higher interest rates could be needed to restrain it.

89. US job openings slip, though remain at healthy level -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers advertised fewer jobs in May amid signs that the economy is weakening, though the overall demand for workers remained strong.

Employers posted 11.3 million job openings at the end of May, the Labor Department said Wednesday, down from nearly 11.7 million in April. Job openings reached 11.9 million in March, the highest level on records dating back more than 20 years. There are nearly two job openings for every unemployed person, a sharp reversal from the historic pattern: Before the pandemic, there were always more unemployed people than available jobs.

90. Genesco taps Sandfort as independent director -

The independent directors of the Genesco board have unanimously selected Gregory A. Sandfort as the company’s lead independent director. Sandfort succeeds Matthew C. Diamond, who has served in that role for the past four years.

91. Australian central bank boosts rate for 3rd month in a row -

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Australia's central bank on Tuesday lifted its benchmark interest rate for a third time in three straight months, changing the cash rate to 1.35% from 0.85%.

The Reserve Bank of Australia's half a percentage point rise was the same size as its June increase.

92. Companies could face hurdles covering abortion travel costs -

After the U.S. Supreme Court revoked the federal right to an abortion that's been in place for half a century, companies like Amazon, Disney, Apple and JP Morgan pledged to cover travel costs for employees who live in states where the procedure is now illegal so they can terminate pregnancies.

93. Add rent to the rising costs bedeviling small businesses -

NEW YORK (AP) — The rent has come due for America's small businesses and at a very inopportune time.

Landlords were lenient about rent payments during the first two years of the pandemic. Now, many are asking for back rent, and some are raising the current rent as well. Meanwhile, most of the government aid programs that helped small businesses get through the pandemic have ended while inflation has sharply pushed up the cost of supplies, shipping, and labor.

94. Average long-term U.S. mortgage rates ease to 5.7% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term U.S. mortgage rates eased back this week after shooting up nearly three-quarters of a point in recent weeks.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac reported Thursday that the 30-year rate fell to 5.70% this week from 5.81% last week. One year ago, however, the average 30-year rate was 2.98%.

95. Slightly fewer Americans apply for jobless claims last week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Slightly fewer Americans applied for unemployment benefits last week, reflecting a robust job market despite rising job cuts in some sectors of the economy that have cooled in recent months.

96. Key inflation gauge tracked by the Fed remains a high 6.3% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A measure of inflation that is closely tracked by the Federal Reserve rose 6.3% in May from a year earlier, unchanged from its level in April.

Thursday's report from the Commerce Department provided the latest evidence that painfully high inflation is pressuring American households and inflicting particular harm on low-income families and people of color.

97. 1st Native American treasurer to push economic development -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Mohegan Chief Marilynn "Lynn" Malerba, the nation's first Native American U.S. treasurer, comes from a line of chiefs who instilled in her the need to keep her tribe healthy and to survive.

98. Most say nation on wrong track, including Dems: AP-NORC poll -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An overwhelming and growing majority of Americans say the U.S. is heading in the wrong direction, including nearly 8 in 10 Democrats, according to a new poll that finds deep pessimism about the economy plaguing President Joe Biden.

99. 345% surge in home sale contracts as mortgage interest rates rise -

The recent increase in interest rates by the Federal Reserve Board has slowed the residential real estate market as buyers and lenders re-assess the buyers’ borrowing abilities. Coupled with a downturn in the stock market, the residential market is resting in some areas and at some prices.

100. Powell: 'No guarantee' Fed can tame inflation, spare jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said there's "no guarantee'' the central bank can tame runaway inflation without hurting the job market.