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Editorial Results (free)

1. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's mangled truths on Russia probe, Cohen -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump can't seem to get his facts straight when it comes to the Russia investigation.

Facing pressure as his former advisers are caught lying by special counsel Robert Mueller, Trump is launching fresh attacks on the probe as politically biased and Mueller as hopelessly "conflicted." This runs counter to ethics experts in Trump's Justice Department who concluded that Mueller — a Republican — could fairly lead the probe into possible coordination between the Trump campaign and Russia during the 2016 election.

2. Trump and Xi agreement buys time in trade war -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The dinner table diplomacy that Presidents Donald Trump and Xi Jinping of China conducted over the weekend produced something as vague as it was valuable: an agreement to keep talking.

3. Tariff tensions shadow US, Canada, Mexico trade pact signing -

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) — President Donald Trump signed a revised North American trade pact with the leaders of Canada and Mexico on Friday, declaring the deal a major victory for workers. But tensions over tariffs, looming GM layoffs and questions about the pact's prospects in Congress clouded the celebratory moment.

4. Global trade is at stake as Trump and Xi come face to face -

WASHINGTON (AP) — To hear President Donald Trump tell it, he was made for a moment like this: A high-stakes face-off. A ticking clock. A cagey adversary.

The man who calls himself a supreme dealmaker will have the opportunity this week to put himself to the test. The question is whether he can defuse a trade war with China that is shaking financial markets and threatening the global economy — and perhaps achieve something approximating a breakthrough.

5. Wall St. disconnect: Traders panicky despite robust economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The nerve-wracking anxiety that's gripped the U.S. stock market seems oddly unmoored from economic reality: Despite the turbulence on Wall Street, economic growth is strong, unemployment ultra-low and consumers exceptionally confident.

6. Stocks mostly recover from an early plunge on Wall Street -

A turbulent day on Wall Street ended Tuesday with stocks climbing nearly all the way out of a steep, broad sell-off that at one point erased more than 500 points from the Dow Jones Industrial Average.

7. US Treasury issues new rules on foreign investments -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Treasury Department issued new rules Wednesday on foreign investments into American companies that will give the government more power to block foreign transactions on national security grounds.

8. AP FACT CHECK: Trump fudges history on black vote, drug cost -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing pivotal November elections, President Donald Trump is misrepresenting the history of African-American voting and exaggerating his influence in boosting income and controlling prescription drug prices.

9. Americans win economics Nobel for work on climate and growth -

STOCKHOLM (AP) — Two Americans won the Nobel Prize in economics on Monday, one for studying the economics of climate change and the other for showing how to help foster the innovation needed to solve such a problem.

10. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's falsehoods on health plan protections -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump isn't playing it straight when it comes to his campaign pledge not to undercut health coverage for people with pre-existing medical conditions.

Five weeks before midterm elections, he is telling voters that those provisions "are safe," even as his Justice Department is arguing in court that those protections in the Affordable Care Act should fall. The short-term health plans Trump often promotes as a bargain alternative to "Obamacare" offer no guarantee of covering pre-existing conditions.

11. China says it won't be pushed around by US on trade -

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — China warned Friday that its critical relationship with the United States could break "like a glass," and used the most global of stages to warn the Trump administration it wouldn't be pushed around on trade.

12. More US corporate giants warn tariffs will mean price hikes -

DETROIT (AP) — From Ford to Walmart to Procter & Gamble, a growing number of iconic American companies are warning that President Donald Trump's tariffs on U.S. imports are raising their costs and prices.

13. US, Japan agree to negotiate a free trade agreement -

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The United States and Japan announced Wednesday they will open negotiations on a bilateral trade agreement between the world's first- and third-largest economies.

It's a significant shift by Tokyo which has been a strong advocate of a multi-nation trans-Pacific trade pact that President Donald Trump withdrew from soon after taking office. The move won Japan relief from the immediate threat of punitive tariffs on its auto exports to the U.S.

14. More US corporate giants warn tariffs will mean price hikes -

DETROIT (AP) — From Ford to Walmart to Procter & Gamble, a growing number of iconic American companies are warning that President Donald Trump's tariffs on U.S. imports are raising their costs and prices.

15. Fed raises rates for 3rd time this year with 1 more expected -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve signaled its confidence Wednesday in the U.S. economy by raising a key interest rate for a third time this year, forecasting another rate hike before year's end and predicting that it will continue to tighten credit into 2020 to help manage growth and inflation.

16. No way out? US, China tariffs may become the 'new normal' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The path to peace in a trade war between the United States and China is getting harder to find as the world's two biggest economies pile ever more taxes on each other's products.

The United States is scheduled to slap tariffs on $200 billion in Chinese imports Monday, adding to the more than $50 billion worth that already face U.S. import taxes. China has vowed to counterpunch with tariffs on $60 billion in U.S. goods.

17. US, Canada pulling all-nighters in talks to revamp NAFTA -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. and Canadian negotiators — facing a deadline at the end of the month — are working long hours to keep Canada in a North American trade bloc.

Canada's Minister of Foreign Affairs Chrystia Freeland resumed talks Wednesday with U.S. Trade Rep. Robert Lighthizer.

18. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's not-so-strong Medicare, economy myths -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Eager to dismiss his critics, President Donald Trump is fabricating the circumstances regarding jobs, the economy and the social safety net.

He insists that Social Security and Medicare are becoming stronger under his watch when the most recent government report shows the financial condition of both programs worsening. On the economy, his claims of spurring the strongest U.S. growth ever fall way short.

19. Trump poised to tax an additional $200B in Chinese imports -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration may be about to slap tariffs of up to 25 percent on an additional $200 billion in Chinese goods, escalating a confrontation between the world's two biggest economies and likely squeezing U.S. companies that import everything from handbags to bicycle tires.

20. Talks with Canadian officials expected after US-Mexico deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Canada's minister of foreign affairs is scheduled to hold talks in Washington on Tuesday in hopes of reaching a trade agreement with the United States, an urgent response after President Donald Trump announced a deal with Mexico on Monday that left out Canada.

21. Preliminary US-Mexico trade deal leaves trail of uncertainty -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's declaration of victory Monday in reaching a preliminary deal with Mexico to replace the North American Free Trade Agreement raised at least as many questions as it answered.

22. US and Mexico tentatively set to replace NAFTA with new deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Snubbing Canada, the Trump administration reached a preliminary deal Monday with Mexico to replace the North American Free Trade Agreement — a move that raised legal questions and threatened to disrupt the operations of companies that do business across the three-country trade bloc.

23. US firms to Trump: Don't raise tariffs on more Chinese goods -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Fishermen off the Alaskan coast. A Florida maker of boat trailers. A building materials distributor in Tennessee.

Those and hundreds of other American businesses are delivering the same plea to President Donald Trump as he considers imposing tariffs on nearly 40 percent of imported Chinese goods:

24. Fed rate policy unintentionally pressures emerging economies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is blaming the United States for Turkey's financial crisis, ignoring homegrown problems like high debts, raging inflation and his own erratic policies.

25. China announces $60B of US goods for tariff retaliation -

BEIJING (AP) — China on Friday announced a $60 billion list of U.S. goods including coffee, honey and industrial chemicals for retaliation if Washington goes ahead with its latest tariff threat.

26. Trump, European Union leaders announce path forward on trade -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and European Union leaders announced Wednesday they have agreed to work toward "zero tariffs" and "zero subsidies" on non-automobile goods and would work to resolve U.S. tariffs on steel and aluminum imports that have roiled European markets.

27. Trump to EU leaders: We want a 'fair trade deal' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump told European leaders Wednesday that the U.S. wants a "fair trade deal" with the European Union as both sides sought to defuse tensions in an escalating trade battle involving some of the world's biggest economies.

28. Auto industry cries foul as Trump moves toward car tariffs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Having started a trade war with China and enraged U.S. allies with steel tariffs, President Donald Trump is primed for his next fight. He is targeting a product at the heart of the American experience: cars.

29. China vows retaliation for $200 billion US tariff threat -

BEIJING (AP) — China's government vowed Wednesday to take "firm and forceful measures" as the U.S. threatened to expand tariffs to thousands of Chinese imports like fish sticks, apples and French doors, the latest salvo in an escalating trade dispute that threatens to chill global economic growth.

30. Trump's tariffs: What they are and how they will work -

WASHINGTON (AP) — So is this what a trade war looks like?

The Trump administration and China's leadership have imposed tens of billions of dollars in tariffs on each other's goods. President Donald Trump has proposed slapping duties on, all told, up to $550 billion if China keeps retaliating and doesn't cave in to U.S. demands to scale back its aggressive industrial policies.

31. Why they fight: US and China brawl over high technology -

WASHINGTON (AP) — To understand why the United States and China stand on the brink of a trade war, consider the near-death experience of American Superconductor Corp.

32. Trump threatens Harley-Davidson with tax punishment for move -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump sought Tuesday to avoid blame for Harley-Davidson's decision to move some motorcycle production overseas and threatened to tax the manufacturer "like never before!" as punishment for the planned production shift.

33. Harley, stung by tariffs, shifts some production overseas -

MILWAUKEE (AP) — Production of Harley-Davidson motorcycles sold in Europe will move from U.S. factories to facilities overseas, the Milwaukee-based company announced Monday, a consequence of the retaliatory tariffs the EU is imposing on American exports in an escalating trade war with the Trump administration.

34. Trump jabbed first, and now world hits back in trade fight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States attacked first, imposing tariffs on steel and aluminum from around the globe and threatening to hit tens of billions of dollars in Chinese products.

Now, the world is punching back.

35. Experts say auto tariffs would raise prices, cost jobs -

DETROIT (AP) — Every workday, about 7,400 trucks mostly loaded with automotive parts rumble across the Ambassador Bridge connecting Detroit and Canada, at times snarling traffic along the busy corridor.

36. AP FACT CHECK: More Trump falsehoods on NKorea, immigration -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is exaggerating the achievements of his Singapore summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, claiming the North has destroyed missile launch sites and no longer has "rockets flying over the place."

37. US trade deficit falls for second straight month in April -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Record exports shaved the U.S. trade deficit in April for the second straight month. But so far this year, the deficit is up 11.5 percent from a year ago despite President Donald Trump's vow to close the gap through new tariffs on imports and renegotiated trade deals.

38. US impose new trade tariffs; EU, Mexico pledge to retaliate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration announced Thursday it will impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from Europe, Mexico and Canada after failing to win concessions from the American allies. Europe and Mexico pledged to retaliate quickly, exacerbating trans-Atlantic and North American trade tensions.

39. Trump launches probe into auto imports, possible tariffs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration on Wednesday launched an investigation into whether tariffs are needed on the imports of automobiles into the United States, moving swiftly as talks over the North American Free Trade Agreement have stalled. President Donald Trump predicted earlier that U.S. automakers and auto workers would be "very happy" with the outcome of the NAFTA talks.

40. Why US-China trade talks left toughest issues unresolved -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing the risk of a mutually harmful trade war, the world's two biggest economies have put their differences on hold. Yet it's far from clear that a fragile truce between the United States and China can hold.

41. US firms seek tariff relief as US and China try to mend rift -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Corporate America is seeking relief from President Donald Trump's threatened tariffs on at least $50 billion in Chinese goods as negotiators seek to prevent a trade war between the world's two biggest economies.

42. Trump's bid to help Chinese firm draws fire but raises hopes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A long-running dispute between American regulators and Chinese telecom company ZTE may have handed President Donald Trump some unexpected leverage in avoiding a trade war with Beijing.
Trump's tweet Sunday that he was working with President Xi Jinping of China to put ZTE "back into business, fast" after U.S. sanctions threatened ZTE's existence and 70,000 Chinese jobs caught many trade-watchers by surprise.
"Too many jobs in China lost," Trump tweeted. "Commerce Department has been instructed to get it done!"
The overture came just as Vice Premier Liu He is flying to Washington for talks aimed at heading off a mutually harmful battle between the world's two biggest economies and just before U.S. companies plan to plead during three days of hearings for a resolution to the dispute.
Trade analysts say it is highly unusual for a president to intercede in a case brought by the Commerce Department and to mix regulatory sanctions with trade negotiations. But they also note that Trump's offer to rescue ZTE, which makes cellphones and other telecommunications equipment, has the potential to clear the way for progress.
"It's a way to unlock negotiations," said Wendy Cutler, a former U.S. trade negotiator specializing in Asia and now vice president at the Asia Society Policy Institute.
The United States has proposed imposing tariffs on up to $150 billion in Chinese products to punish Beijing for forcing American companies to hand over technology in exchange for access to the Chinese markets. In retaliation, Beijing is threatening tariffs on $50 billion in U.S. products.
"Trump's tweet creates an atmosphere where there's more hope for reaching an agreement on trade," said David Dollar, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and a former official at the World Bank and the U.S. Treasury Department.
The United States also needs China's support as it prepares for talks with North Korea that are intended to persuade the Pyongyang regime to abandon nuclear weapons.
Commerce and ZTE last year settled charges that the Chinese company sold sensitive telecommunications equipment to Iran and North Korea in violation of U.S. sanctions. ZTE agreed to plead guilty and pay about $1 billion in fines.
Last month, Commerce accused ZTE of violating the agreement and blocked ZTE from importing American components for seven years. The department said ZTE had misled regulators: Instead of disciplining all employees involved in the sanctions violations, Commerce said, ZTE paid some of them full bonuses and then lied about it.
The seven-year ban was tantamount to a death sentence for ZTE.
"It was basically going to put them out of business," Dollar said. "They rely on American technology."
Last week, the company announced that it was halting operations.
Early this month, a high-level U.S. delegation — including Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, top American trade negotiator Robert Lighthizer and White House adviser Peter Navarro — traveled to Beijing to address the trade dispute. There, they heard an outcry about U.S. regulators putting ZTE out of business.
"They were a little bit blindsided," said Paul Triolo, a technology specialist at the Eurasia Group consultancy. "The Chinese reaction was pretty vociferous. ... The U.S. government shooting down the No. 2 telecommunications supplier in China at this sensitive time — it didn't look good."
Now, analysts see the outlines of a potential deal: In return for Trump's lifeline to ZTE, Beijing might agree to buy more U.S. products or take other steps to shrink America's gaping trade deficit with China — $337 billion last year.
The Wall Street Journal reported Monday that the two countries were in talks about such a potential swap: The U.S. would spare ZTE, and Beijing would drop plans to impose tariffs on U.S. farm products. Neither the White House nor the Commerce Department would comment.
The ZTE case also drives home how entwined the U.S. and Chinese economies are. The Commerce sanctions didn't just imperil ZTE; they also hurt the American companies that sell components to the Chinese company.
And so investors breathed a sigh of relief after Trump's tweet, buying stock Monday in Maynard, Massachusetts-based optical components maker Acacia Communications, which last year collected 30 percent of its revenue from ZTE; San Jose-based optical communications company Oclaro; and Sunnyvale, California-based fiber optic cable manufacturer Finisar.
Still, critics charged that Trump shouldn't have intervened in the legal case against ZTE.
"This would be a truly awful deal for the U.S," Derek Scissors, a China specialist at the conservative American Enterprise Institute, wrote in a blog post. "If the accusations last year and last month are accurate, ZTE violated Iran sanctions, then further attempted to deceive the U.S. government."
Xi "would be using barriers against American agriculture to blackmail the Trump administration into accepting ZTE's behavior," Scissors said.
Trump has thrust trade policy to the center of his agenda. In addition to sparring with China, his team is in talks to rewrite the North America Free Trade Agreement with Mexico and Canada.
The timing of the NAFTA negotiations is tight: House Speaker Paul Ryan has said Congress must have an agreement by Thursday to have any hope of approving it this year.
___
Follow Paul Wiseman on Twitter at https://twitter.com/PaulWisemanAP

...

43. China cutting US soybean purchases in face of tariffs threat -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With the threat of tariffs and counter-tariffs between Washington and Beijing looming, Chinese buyers are canceling orders for U.S. soybeans, a trend that could deal a blow to American farmers if it continues.

44. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for March 2018 -

Top residential real estate sales, March 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

45. Trump flips on trade pact, weighs rejoining Pacific-Rim deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a striking reversal, President Donald Trump has asked trade officials to explore the possibility of the United States rejoining the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement, a free trade deal he pulled out of during his first days in office as part of his "America first" agenda.

46. Trump, China escalate trade dispute as markets tumble -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Unwilling to yield, President Donald Trump and China's government escalated their trade clash Friday, with Beijing vowing to "counterattack with great strength" if Trump follows through on threats to impose tariffs on an additional $100 billion in Chinese goods.

47. US trade gap rises 6th straight month to 9 ½-year high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit rose for the sixth straight month in February, reaching the highest level since October 2008 and defying President Donald Trump's efforts to rebalance America's lopsided trade with the rest of the world.

48. US trade gap rises 6th straight month to 9½-year high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit rose for the sixth straight month in February, reaching the highest level since October 2008 and defying President Donald Trump's efforts to rebalance America's lopsided trade with the rest of the world.

49. 11 nations sign Pacific trade pact as Trump plans US tariffs -

SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) — Trade ministers from 11 Pacific Rim countries signed a sweeping free trade agreement Thursday to streamline trade and slash tariffs just hours before President Donald Trump announced his plans to impose new tariffs on aluminum and steel to protect U.S. producers.

50. US trade gap rises to $56.6 billion, highest since 2008 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit rose in January to the highest level since October 2008, defying President Donald Trump's efforts to bring more balance to America's trade with the rest of the world.

51. As Trump weighs tariff, US steelmakers enjoy rising profits -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration has chosen an odd time to offer special protection to the U.S. steel industry.

As President Donald Trump prepares to impose a 25 percent tax on imported steel, America's steelmakers are actually faring pretty well: The U.S. steel industry last year earned more than $2.8 billion, up from $714 million in 2016 and a loss in 2015, according to the Commerce Department. And the industry added more than 8,000 jobs between January 2017 and January 2018.

52. Ryan wants Trump to take 'surgical approach' on trade -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Worried about economic ramifications, House Speaker Paul Ryan called on President Donald Trump to back away from his plan for broad international tariffs, arguing Tuesday that a "more surgical approach" would help avert a potentially dangerous trade war.

53. Trump, Canada's Trudeau talk trade and NAFTA in phone call -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a remarkably public confrontation, House Speaker Paul Ryan and other Republican allies of President Donald Trump are pleading with him to back away from his threatened international tariffs, which they fear could spark a dangerous trade war. Trump retorted: "We're not backing down."

54. Trump: "Trade wars are good, and easy to win" -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Friday insisted "trade wars are good, and easy to win," a bold claim that prompted threats of retaliation against U.S. exports like blue jeans and motorcycles.

55. Trump to impose tariffs on imports of steel and aluminum -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Determined to protect vital American industries, President Donald Trump declared Thursday that he will impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports, dramatically raising the possibility of a trade showdown with China and other key trading partners.

56. White House: Trump to announce on steel, aluminum tariffs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump planned to announce Thursday whether he'll impose tariffs or quotas on steel and aluminum imports, a White House official said.

Increased foreign production, especially by China, has driven down prices and hurt American producers, creating a situation the Commerce Department says poses a national security threat.

57. Why Trump's effort to curb immigration could hurt US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — America's 21st century job market increasingly demands high-tech skills and knowledge. Yet consider this: Nearly half the new jobs the government foresees emerging by 2026 will require only a high school diploma — or none at all.

58. Commerce Dept. backs tariffs on imported aluminum and steel -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Commerce Department is urging President Donald Trump to impose tariffs or quotas on imported aluminum and steel, which it calls a natural security threat.

The recommendations unveiled by Secretary Wilbur Ross Friday are likely to escalate tensions with China and other U.S. trading partners. Stepped-up foreign production of steel and aluminum, especially by China, has driven down prices and hurt American producers.

59. Despite Trump's tough talk, trade gap widens to 9-year high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump campaigned on a promise to overturn U.S. trade policy and bring down the country's massive, persistent trade deficits.

After a year in the White House, he still has a lot of work to do.

60. US industries can start counting their benefits from tax law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Craft breweries are raising a glass to the Republicans' new tax overhaul: It cuts the excise tax on beer. Retailers, long saddled with heavy tax bills, will get relief. So will some high-profile names in corporate finance, led by Wells Fargo.

61. A sweeping tax plan with promises that face widespread doubts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's a once-in-a-generation opportunity to fix a tax code that stifles business investment, keeps trillions in corporate profits languishing overseas and slows the American economy.

62. AP FACT CHECK: Trump on taxes, women, Russia probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump often talks about a pile of money sitting overseas that will come flooding back into the U.S. once his tax plan is in place. That's something of a mirage.

He addressed the subject Saturday as Marine One roared nearby, waiting to take him to Camp David, Maryland. Over the past week, Trump's remarks on a variety of subjects called for scrutiny: the tax overhaul that appears on track to become law, women who accused him of sexual come-ons, the Russia investigation and more.

63. Derided by critics, trickle-down economics gets another try -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Does money roll downhill? In their drive to cut taxes, President Donald Trump and congressional Republicans are betting it does.

Behind their legislation is a theory long popular among conservatives: Slash taxes for corporations and rich people, who will then hire, invest and profit — and cause money to trickle into the pockets of ordinary Americans. The White House says the plan's corporate tax cut alone would eventually raise average household incomes by $4,000 a year.

64. Gullett Sanford Robinson & Martin adds 2 attorneys -

The law firm of Gullett Sanford Robinson & Martin PLLC has hired Flynne Bailey and Hilary Dennen, both litigation attorneys.

Bailey joins as an associate and practices in the areas of complex business and commercial litigation, personal injury defense litigation, governmental liability litigation and real estate litigation.

65. The gaping US trade gap: A sign of weakness? Not necessarily -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump ripped into one of his favorite targets Thursday in Beijing: The United States' "shockingly" large trade deficit with China.

"I blame past administrations," Trump declared, "for allowing this out-of-control deficit to take place and grow."

66. Why debt from GOP tax cuts might impose a painful price -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When House Republicans proposed their tax-cut plan last week, critics noted that it came with a towering price: It would swell the nation's debt by $1.5 trillion at a time when the economy is already faring well on its own and a vast generation of retiring baby boomers threatens to strain the Social Security and Medicare programs.

67. Why tax plan might not put US firms' overseas cash to work -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House Republican tax bill is meant to send trillions in corporate profits overseas pouring back home and, in the process, give the U.S. economy a healthy boost.

It may be more likely to land with an economic thud and provide a windfall to tax attorneys scouring the Byzantine bill for tax breaks on behalf of corporate clients.

68. Richard Thaler wins Nobel for work in behavioral economics -

STOCKHOLM (AP) — The Nobel prize in economics has been awarded to Richard Thaler of the University of Chicago for research showing how people's choices on economic matters — whether on savings or game shows like "Deal or No Deal" — are not always rational.

69. Top Middle Tennessee commercial transactions for August 2017 -

Top commercial real estate sales, August 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

70. Yellen defends bank regulations passed after 2008 crisis -

JACKSON HOLE, Wyoming (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen on Friday emphatically defended the web of regulations the Fed helped enact after the 2008 financial crisis, saying it helped restore the banking system's health and disputing criticism that the rules have hurt lending.

71. Trump bashes NAFTA in midst of talks to revamp trade deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Just a week into talks to rewrite the North American Free Trade Agreement, President Donald Trump is already threatening to abandon the 23-year-old pact with Canada and Mexico.

At a high-profile campaign-style rally in Phoenix on Tuesday night, Trump predicted that the United States would "end up probably terminating" NAFTA "at some point," though he said he hadn't made a final decision.

72. XMI hires vice president, managing director of financial operations -

XMI, a provider of business process management services for entrepreneurial, high growth businesses, has added Joshua Farber, MBA, CPA, as vice president and managing director of financial operations.

73. AP FACT CHECK: A rash of Trump statements under scrutiny -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has reopened his Twitter spigot now that his foreign trip is over, so brace yourself. The intensifying investigations into Russian interference in the election and the potential involvement of associates have reached his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, and appear to have caught the president in a bare-knuckled mood.

74. Why Trump's combative trade stance makes US farmers nervous -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A sizable majority of rural Americans backed Donald Trump's presidential bid, drawn to his calls to slash environmental rules, strengthen law enforcement and replace the federal health care law.

75. AP FACT CHECK: No, manufacturing and coal are not rebounding -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump wants to show that his economic vision of America — making products again, raising great buildings and mining coal — is already coming true, despite the lack of legislation powering that dream. So when the latest jobs report came out, the White House eagerly trumpeted the robust results. But it was out of tune.

76. Trump says US won't leave NAFTA – for now -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said he has told the leaders of Mexico and Canada that he will not pull out of the North American Free Trade Agreement at this time, but could still withdraw if he concludes a renegotiated pact is not "a fair deal for all."

77. White House: Trump will not immediately bolt NAFTA -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Wednesday told the leaders of Mexico and Canada that he will not immediately pull out of the North American Free Trade Agreement, just hours after administration officials said he was considering a draft executive order to do just that.

78. Farmers fear deportation of workers could hurt livelihood -

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The head of Bethel Heights Vineyard looked out over the 100 acres of vines her crew of 20 Mexicans had just finished pruning, worried about what will happen if the Trump administration presses ahead with its crackdown on immigrants.

79. Trump targets visa program for highly skilled workers -

KENOSHA, Wis. (AP) — President Donald Trump hopes to revive the economic populism that helped drive his election campaign, signing an order Tuesday in politically important Wisconsin to tighten rules on technology companies bringing in highly skilled foreign workers.

80. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for December 2015 -

Top residential real estate sales, December 2015, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

81. Bar’s public service award goes to Conner -

In recognition of more than 50 years of service to both the legal profession and the Middle Tennessee community, Waller attorney and mediator Lew Conner is being honored with the John C. Tune Public Service Award at the Nashville Bar Association’s annual meeting and banquet.

82. Is now time for a Fed rate hike? Here are 2 clashing views -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For seven years — through political fights, Europe debt crises and market panic — investors could count on one thing: Short-term U.S. interest rates would stay locked near zero.

Such was the will of the Federal Reserve, which remained wary of the economy's durability long after the gravest recession since the 1930s had ended.

83. Bills joins Wiseman Ashworth Law Group -

Attorney Anthony C. Bills has joined Wiseman Ashworth Law Group, PLC, as an associate.

Bills was previously an associate with the Nashville firm Manier & Herod. His professional experience includes all phases of litigation and practice including personal injury, products liability, nursing home litigation, health care law, mental health law, premises liability and fidelity and surety law.

84. Steaban, Edgeworth take on new roles at VUMC -

Robin Steaban, MSN, R.N., VUMC associate chief nursing officer and chief administrative officer at the Vanderbilt Heart and Vascular Institute, has been promoted to the newly created position of chief nursing officer for Vanderbilt University Hospital and Clinics.

85. Weak job growth makes bold Fed action more likely -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers added 96,000 jobs in August, a tepid figure that points to the economy's persistent weakness and slowing prospects for the unemployed.

The unemployment rate fell to 8.1 percent from 8.3 percent in July. But that was only because more people gave up looking for jobs. People out of work are counted as unemployed only if they're looking for a job.

86. Jobs data force delicate balancing act for Obama -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A third straight month of weak hiring shows the U.S. economy is still struggling three years after the recession officially ended.

U.S. employers added just 80,000 jobs in June, and the unemployment rate was unchanged at 8.2 percent, the Labor Department said Friday.

87. US employers still waiting for sales to pick up -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy suddenly looks a lot weaker.

Only 69,000 jobs were added in May, the fewest in a year, and the unemployment rate rose from 8.1 percent to 8.2 percent.

88. Cheekwood announces 2012 board officers -

The Board of Trustees of Cheekwood Botanical Garden & Museum of Art has recently announced new officers of the Board to serve two-year terms: They are:

89. Corizon chooses new chief HRO -

Corizon, the nation’s leader in correctional health care solutions, has announced the hiring of Dennis Wade as Senior Vice President, Chief Human Resources Officer (CHRO). He joins Brentwood-based Corizon after serving as vice president and CHRO with Baptist Health Care in Pensacola, Fla. In this role he had corporate-wide accountability for all human resources functions and activities including strategic planning, talent and performance management, recruitment, executive and incentive compensation, employee labor relations, information systems, benefits, organizational development and training.