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Editorial Results (free)

1. Resilient US consumers spend slightly more in August -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Consumers spent a bit more in August than the previous month, a sign the economy is holding up even as inflation lifts prices for food, rent, and other essentials.

Americans boosted their spending at stores and for services such as haircuts by 0.4% in August, after it fell 0.2% in July, the Commerce Department said Friday. The government's report also showed that an inflation gauge closely monitored by the Federal Reserve rose 0.3% last month, faster than July.

2. EXPLAINER: How do we know when a recession has begun? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The economy shrank in the first half of this year, the government confirmed in a report Thursday, underscoring fears of a broad-based slowdown that could lead to a recession.

At the same time, the number of people seeking unemployment benefits — a figure that often reflects the pace of layoffs — fell to a five-month low. The drop suggests that companies are holding onto their staffs, despite the slowdown in growth, and that those who do get laid off are quickly finding new jobs.

3. US economy drops at 0.6% annual rate from April through June -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Battered by surging consumer prices and rising interest rates, the U.S. economy shrank at a 0.6% annual rate from April through June, the government announced Thursday, unchanged from its previous second-quarter estimate.

4. Fed's Powell urges broader regulation for stablecoins -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said Tuesday that stablecoins will need greater regulation as they become more widely used by consumers.

5. Fed officials call for more rate hikes to fight inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve will have to keep boosting its benchmark interest rate to a point that raises unemployment and gets inflation down from unusually high levels, two officials said in separate remarks Monday.

6. Boston Fed's Collins says 'modest slowdown' is possible -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Susan Collins, the new president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, said Monday that a higher unemployment rate will be needed to bring down inflation from unusually high levels, but also suggested any economic downturn would likely be modest.

7. Wall Street ends lower as global central banks raise rates -

Stocks closed lower on Wall Street, deepening their losses for the week, as central banks around the world raised interest rates to fight inflation. The S&P 500 fell 0.8% Thursday. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell about half as much, and the Nasdaq composite lost 1.4%. Central banks in Europe and Asia increased rates a day after the Federal Reserve made another big rate hike and signaled more were on the way. The goal is to cool down economies by making it more expensive to borrow money. The yield on the 2-year Treasury, which tends to follow expectations for Fed action, rose significantly.

8. More Americans apply for jobless aid last week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans filing for jobless benefits rose slightly last week with the Federal Reserve pushing hard to cool the economy and tamp down inflation.

Applications for unemployment benefits for the week ending Sept. 17 rose by 5,000 to 213,000, the Labor Department reported Thursday. Last week's number was revised down by 5,000 to 208,000, the lowest figure since May.

9. Powell's stark message: Inflation fight may cause recession -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve delivered its bluntest reckoning Wednesday of what it will take to finally tame painfully high inflation: Slower growth, higher unemployment and potentially a recession.

10. Fed attacks inflation with another big hike and expects more -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Intensifying its fight against high inflation, the Federal Reserve raised its key interest rate Wednesday by a substantial three-quarters of a point for a third straight time and signaled more large rate hikes to come — an aggressive pace that will heighten the risk of an eventual recession.

11. How steep Fed rate hikes affect your finances -

NEW YORK (AP) — Mortgage rates have jumped, home sales have slumped and credit cards and auto loans have gotten pricier. Savings rates are slightly juicier, though.

As the Federal Reserve has rapidly increased interest rates, many economists say they fear that a recession is inevitable in the coming months — and with it, job losses that could cause hardship for households already hurt worst by inflation.

12. How much 'pain'? Fed to signal more rate hikes ahead -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell bluntly warned in a speech last month that the Fed's drive to curb inflation by aggressively raising interest rates would "bring some pain." On Wednesday, Americans may get a better sense of how much pain could be in store.

13. Mortgage rates hit 6%, first time since 2008 housing crash -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term U.S. mortgage rates climbed over 6% this week for the first time since the housing crash of 2008, threatening to sideline even more homebuyers from a rapidly cooling housing market.

14. Fewer Americans file for jobless benefits again last week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits fell again last week to a four-month low even as the Federal Reserve continues its aggressive interest rate cuts to bring inflation under control.

15. US inflation still stubbornly high despite August slowdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lower gas costs slowed U.S. inflation for a second straight month in August, but most other prices across the economy kept rising — evidence that inflation remains a heavy burden for American households.

16. Stocks end broadly higher, breaking a 3-week losing streak -

Wall Street added to its recent gains Friday with a broad rally that broke the market's three-week losing streak.

The S&P 500 closed 1.5% higher, its third straight increase, and ended with a 3.7% gain for the week. That makes it the benchmark index's best week going back to July.

17. Stocks recover from a stumble on Wall Street and end higher -

The stock market recovered from a midday stumble and ended higher, staying on track for its first weekly gain in four weeks.

The S&P 500 rose 0.7% Thursday. The Nasdaq composite and the Dow Jones Industrial average also ended higher after bumpy rides of their own.

18. Long-term mortgage rates now at highest point since 2008 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term U.S. mortgage rates jumped again this week, hitting the highest levels in almost 14 years and pushing even more would-be buyers out of the market.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac reported Thursday that the 30-year rate jumped to 5.89% from 5.66% last week. That's the highest the long-term rate has been since November of 2008, just after the housing market collapse set off the Great Recession. One year ago, the rate stood at 2.88%.

19. Powell: Higher rates unlikely to cause deep US recession -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The last time the Federal Reserve faced inflation as high as it is now, in the early 1980s, it jacked up interest rates to double-digit levels — and in the process caused a deep recession and sharply higher unemployment.

20. Fewer Americans apply for jobless aid last week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans filing for unemployment benefits last week fell to its lowest level since May despite repeated attempts by the Federal Reserve to cool the economy and bring inflation under control.

21. Fed's Brainard: Rates to rise higher, stay elevated longer -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve will need to continue lifting its short-term interest rate to a level that restricts economic growth and keep it there for an extended period, a top Fed official said Wednesday.

22. Stocks shed early gains, end lower for 3rd straight week -

Stocks gave up an early rally and closed lower Friday, marking their third losing week in a row and extending Wall Street's late-summer slump.

Major stock indexes initially climbed broadly following the government's latest job market report, which showed employers slowed their hiring in August. The report put traders in a buying mood, stoking cautious optimism that the Federal Reserve may not need to raise interest rates as aggressively in its ongoing bid to tame inflation.

23. EXPLAINER: 5 key takeaways from the August jobs report -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The nation's job market last month delivered what the Federal Reserve and nervous investors had been hoping for: A Goldilocks-style hiring report.

Job growth was solid — not too hot, not too cold. And more Americans began looking for work, which could ease worker shortages over time and defuse some of the inflationary pressures that the Fed has made its No. 1 mission.

24. Lower US job gain in August could aid Fed's inflation fight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — America's employers added a healthy number of jobs last month, yet slowed their hiring enough to potentially help the Federal Reserve in its fight to reduce raging inflation.

25. Fed is hoping August hiring report will show slowdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Raging inflation has so scrambled the economy that it's come to this: If Friday's jobs report for August were to show a significant hiring slowdown, the Federal Reserve — and even the White House — would likely welcome it.

26. Mortgage rates rise to 5.66%, weighing on housing market -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term U.S. mortgage rates rose to their highest level in two months this week, providing no relief for a slumping housing market.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac reported Thursday that the 30-year rate rose to 5.66% from 5.55% last week. One year ago, the rate stood at 2.87%.

27. Fewer Americans file for jobless benefits last week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Fewer Americans filed for unemployment benefits last week as the labor market continues to shine despite weakening elements of the U.S. economy.

Applications for jobless aid for the week ending Aug. 27 fell by 5,000 to 232,000, the Labor Department reported Thursday.

28. Stocks end lower in choppy trading, on pace for weekly loss -

Stocks closed lower in another day of choppy trading on Wall Street, on pace for a weekly loss after several days of declines. Losses in technology and retail stocks outweighed gains in communications and other sectors. The S&P 500 lost nearly 1% Wednesday after wavering between gains and losses. The Dow Jones Industrial Average and Nasdaq composite also lost ground. Bed Bath & Beyond lost almost a quarter of its value after announcing a major restructuring and a stock sale. Treasury yields were mixed and energy prices fell. The market closed August broadly lower after surging in July.

29. US consumers more confident in August as gas prices dip -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Following three straight monthly declines, U.S. consumer confidence rebounded in August as inflation moderated and gas prices fell.

The Conference Board said Tuesday that its consumer confidence index rose in August to 103.2 from 95.3 in July.

30. Job vacancies rose in July, dashing Fed hopes for cooling -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of open jobs in the United States rose in July after three months of declines, a sign that employers are still urgently seeking workers despite a weakening economy and high inflation.

31. Stocks sink after Fed's Powell says rates will stay high -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are ending sharply lower after the head of the Federal Reserve dashed Wall Street's hopes that it may soon ease up on rate hikes in its effort to tame inflation. The S&P 500 lost 3.4% Friday, its biggest drop in two months, after Jerome Powell said the Fed will likely need to keep interest rates high enough to slow the economy for some time in order to beat back the high inflation sweeping the country. Tech stocks led the way lower, pulling the Nasdaq composite down even more. Higher rates help corral inflation, but they also hurt asset prices.

32. Powell: Fed's inflation fight could bring 'pain,' job losses -

JACKSON HOLE, Wyoming (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell delivered a stark warning Friday about the Fed's determination to fight inflation with more sharp interest rate hikes: It will likely cause pain for Americans in the form of a weaker economy and job losses.

33. Hints of cooling prices, but Fed vows firm inflation stance -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation eased last month as energy prices tumbled, raising hopes that the surging costs of everything from gasoline to food may have peaked.

According to a Commerce Department report Friday that is closely watched by the Federal Reserve, consumer prices rose 6.3% in July from a year earlier after posting an annual increase of 6.8% in June, the biggest jump since 1982. Energy prices made the difference in July: They dropped last month after surging in June.

34. Climate change alters life at Fed's Jackson Hole conference -

JACKSON HOLE, Wyoming (AP) — When officials of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City sought a location for an annual economic symposium in 1981, they chose Jackson Hole, Wyoming, for a simple reason: It had fly-fishing.

35. Average US long-term mortgage rates rise; 30-year at 5.55% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term U.S. mortgage rates rose this week as inflation worries remained at the fore and the slowdown in economic growth weighs on the housing market.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac reported Thursday that the 30-year rate increased to 5.55% from 5.13% last week. Last year at this time, the rate stood at 2.87%.

36. Government revision shows economy shrank 0.6% last quarter -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy shrank at a 0.6% annual rate from April through June, the government said Thursday in an upgrade from its initial estimate. It marked a second straight quarter of economic contraction, which meets one informal sign of a recession.

37. Fewer Americans claim jobless benefits last week -

NEW YORK (AP) — Fewer Americans filed for unemployment benefits last week as the labor market continues to stand out as one of the strongest segments of the U.S. economy.

Applications for jobless aid for the week ending Aug. 20 fell by 2,000 to 243,000, the Labor Department reported Thursday.

38. Stocks close higher as Wall Street awaits Fed speech -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are closing higher as Wall Street recovered some of this week's steep losses ahead of a highly anticipated speech by the Federal Reserve chair later this week.

The S&P 500 ended 0.3% higher Wednesday. The Dow Jones Industrial Average and Nasdaq also inched higher.

39. EXPLAINER: Why is Wall Street back on the roller coaster? -

NEW YORK (AP) — And back down goes Wall Street. After getting mauled most of the year, prices for all kinds of investments steadied in the summer and were heading back up. The recovery was so strong that some investors wondered if Wall Street's "bear market" was coming to an end.

40. Stocks fall broadly on Wall Street, extending market losses -

Another broad stock market sell-off on Monday deepened Wall Street's losses from last week, leaving the S&P 500 with its biggest slide since mid-June.

The benchmark index fell 2.1%, nearly doubling its losses from last week, when it broke a four-week winning streak. The Dow Jones Industrial Average slumped 1.9% and the Nasdaq dropped 2.5%.

41. Fed saw evidence of a slowing economy at its last meeting -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve officials saw signs that the U.S. economy was weakening at their last meeting but still called inflation "unacceptably high'' before raising their benchmark interest rate by a sizable three-quarters of a point in their drive to slow spiking prices.

42. US wholesale inflation fell in July for 1st time in 2 years -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Prices at the wholesale level fell from June to July, the first month-to-month drop in more than two years and a sign that some of the U.S. economy's inflationary pressures cooled last month.

43. EXPLAINER: Mixed US inflation signs. Where are prices going? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Consumers struggling with skyrocketing prices for food, gas, autos and rent got a tantalizing hint of relief last month, when prices didn't budge at all from June after 25 straight months of increases. With gas prices continuing to fall, inflation is probably slowing further this month.

44. Lower prices offer Americans slight reprieve from inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Falling prices for gas, airline tickets and clothes gave Americans a little bit of relief last month, though overall inflation is still running at close to its highest level in four decades.

45. US inflation will likely stay high even as gas prices fall -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans may finally be catching a break from relentlessly surging prices — if just a slight one — even as inflation is expected to remain painfully high for months.

Thanks largely to falling gas prices, the government's inflation report for July, to be released Wednesday morning, is expected to show that prices jumped 8.7% from a year earlier — still a sizzling pace but a slowdown from the 9.1% year-over-year figure in June, which was the highest in four decades.

46. EXPLAINER: How do we know when a recession has begun? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy has contracted for two straight quarters, intensifying fears that the nation is on the cusp of a recession — if not already in one — barely two years after the pandemic recession officially ended.

47. Employment market shows signs of cooling amid rate hikes -

NEW YORK (AP) — The employment market appears to have lost some of its sizzle, a development that could influence Federal Reserve policy and further raise concerns about an economic recession among investors.

48. Inflation and wage data suggest US prices will keep climbing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation surged in June and workers' average wages accelerated in the spring — signs that Americans won't likely feel any relief from rising prices anytime soon and that the Federal Reserve will feel compelled to further raise borrowing costs.

49. EXPLAINER: How do we know when a recession has begun? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy has contracted for two straight quarters, intensifying fears that the nation is on the cusp of a recession — if not already in one — barely two years after the pandemic recession officially ended.

50. US not yet in recession and 4 other takeaways from the Fed -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Jerome Powell delivered a tough message at the start of a news conference Wednesday: Inflation is way too high, and the Federal Reserve is laser-focused on taming it with higher borrowing costs.

51. US economy shrinks for a 2nd quarter, raising recession fear -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy shrank from April through June for a second straight quarter, contracting at a 0.9% annual pace and raising fears that the nation may be approaching a recession.

52. How the Federal Reserve's rate hikes affect your finances -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Higher mortgage rates have sent home sales tumbling. Credit card rates have grown more burdensome, and so have auto loans. Savers are finally receiving yields that are actually visible, while crypto assets are reeling.

53. Fed unleashes another big rate hike in bid to curb inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve on Wednesday raised its benchmark interest rate by a hefty three-quarters of a point for a second straight time in its most aggressive drive in three decades to tame high inflation.

54. EXPLAINER: How do we know when a recession has begun? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — By one common definition, the U.S. economy is on the cusp of a recession. Yet that definition isn't the one that counts.

On Thursday, when the government estimates the gross domestic product for the April-June period, some economists think it may show that the economy shrank for a second straight quarter. That would meet a longstanding assumption for when a recession has begun.

55. US economy sending mixed signals: Here's what it all means -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy is caught in an awkward, painful place. A confusing one, too.

Growth appears to be sputtering, home sales are tumbling and economists warn of a potential recession ahead. But consumers are still spending, businesses keep posting profits and the economy keeps adding hundreds of thousands of jobs each month.

56. Fed set to impose another big rate hike to fight inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Conflicting signs about the health of the U.S. economy have thrust the Federal Reserve into a difficult spot.

With inflation raging at a four-decade high, the job market strong and consumer spending still solid, the Fed is under pressure to raise interest rates aggressively.

57. Fed ethics inquiry clears Powell and Clarida trades -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve's inspector general concluded Thursday that financial trades made several years ago by Chair Jerome Powell and Richard Clarida, then the vice chair, did not violate any laws or ethics rules.

58. Fed board member opens door to 1-point hike if demand rises -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Christopher Waller, a member of the Federal Reserve's Board of Governors, said Thursday that he would be open to supporting a huge 1 percentage point increase in the Fed's key short-term interest rate later this month if upcoming economic data points to robust consumer spending.

59. EXPLAINER: Why US inflation is so high, and when it may ease -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation's relentless surge didn't merely persist in June. It accelerated.

For the 12 months ending in June, the government's consumer price index rocketed 9.1%, the fastest year-over-year jump since 1981.

60. Fed's Bullard: Solid US economy can handle rising rates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy is healthy and shows little sign of an imminent recession, and can withstand higher interest rates, St. Louis Federal Reserve president James Bullard said Monday.

61. A robust June jobs report clouds outlook for US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A strong hiring report for June has assuaged fears that the U.S. economy might be on the cusp of a recession — and highlighted the resilience of the nation's job market.

62. Fed: Sharply higher rates may be needed to quell inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve officials were concerned at their meeting last month that consumers were increasingly anticipating higher inflation, and they signaled that much higher interest rates could be needed to restrain it.

63. US job openings slip, though remain at healthy level -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers advertised fewer jobs in May amid signs that the economy is weakening, though the overall demand for workers remained strong.

Employers posted 11.3 million job openings at the end of May, the Labor Department said Wednesday, down from nearly 11.7 million in April. Job openings reached 11.9 million in March, the highest level on records dating back more than 20 years. There are nearly two job openings for every unemployed person, a sharp reversal from the historic pattern: Before the pandemic, there were always more unemployed people than available jobs.

64. Genesco taps Sandfort as independent director -

The independent directors of the Genesco board have unanimously selected Gregory A. Sandfort as the company’s lead independent director. Sandfort succeeds Matthew C. Diamond, who has served in that role for the past four years.

65. Powell: 'No guarantee' Fed can tame inflation, spare jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said there's "no guarantee'' the central bank can tame runaway inflation without hurting the job market.

66. Stocks slide on Wall Street as inflation worries persist -

Stocks closed broadly lower on Wall Street Tuesday, after a discouraging snapshot of U.S. consumer confidence stoked investors' worries about the risk that sharply higher interest rates and pervasive inflation could trigger a recession.

67. Europe's central bank ready to 'stamp out' surging inflation -

SINTRA, Portugal (AP) — The head of the European Central Bank said Tuesday that it will move gradually to combat soaring consumer prices with interest rate hikes in July and September but will keep its options open to "stamp out" inflation if it surges faster than expected.

68. Wall Street shakes off a midday stumble and ends higher -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks shook off a midday slump and ended higher, keeping major indexes on track for weekly gains.

Trading was wobbly throughout the day as investors remained focused on another day of testimony before Congress by Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell.

69. Powell: Fed must convince public it can tame inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As if their job weren't hard enough at a time of raging inflation, Chair Jerome Powell and his Federal Reserve colleagues have to do more these days than decide just how much to raise interest rates without triggering a recession.

70. US stocks give up afternoon gains and end slightly lower -

NEW YORK (AP) — A choppy day of trading on Wall Street ended with a modest pullback for stocks Wednesday, the latest bout of volatility for the market amid concerns about inflation and uncertainty over whether rising interest rates will help or hinder the economy.

71. Powell: Fed aims to avoid recession but says it's possible -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell sought Wednesday to reassure the public that the Fed will raise interest rates high and fast enough to quell inflation, without tightening credit so much as to throttle the economy and cause a recession.

72. Wall Street ends broadly higher after sharp losses last week -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are ending higher on Wall Street Tuesday, clawing back some of the ground they lost last week in their worst weekly drop since the beginning of the pandemic.

The S&P 500 rose 2.4%. It's still 21.5% below the record high it set in January. The tech-heavy Nasdaq climbed 2.5% and the Dow Jones Industrial Average added 2.1%.

73. Fed's Powell facing rising criticism for inflation missteps -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell won praise for his deft leadership during the maelstrom of the pandemic recession. As threats to the U.S. economy have mounted, though, Powell has increasingly struck Fed watchers as much less sure-footed.

74. Wall Street closes worst week since 2020 with slight gain -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street closed out its most punishing week since the 2020 coronavirus crash with a meandering day of trading Friday that left it a bit higher.

The S&P 500 rose 8.07 points, or 0.2%, to 3,674.84 after waffling between modest losses and gains for most of the day. The Dow Jones Industrial Average dipped 38.29, or 0.1%, to 29,888.78, while the Nasdaq composite climbed 152.25, or 1.4%, to 10,798.35.

75. Fed's aggressive rate hikes raise likelihood of a recession -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell has pledged to do whatever it takes to curb inflation, now raging at a four-decade high and defying the Fed's efforts so far to tame it.

Increasingly, it seems, doing so might require the one painful thing the Fed has sought to avoid: A recession.

76. Bank of England hikes interest rates but resists bolder move -

LONDON (AP) — The Bank of England raised interest rates by a quarter-percentage point Thursday, shrugging off pressure for a bolder move to combat price increases that have pushed inflation to a 40-year high.

77. This is how a higher Fed rate could affect your finances -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Record-low mortgages are long gone. Credit card rates will likely rise. So will the cost of an auto loan. Savers may finally see a noticeable return.

The unusually large t hree-quarter point hike in its benchmark short-term rate that the Federal Reserve announced Wednesday won't, by itself, have a huge effect on most Americans' finances. But combined with earlier rate hikes and additional large increases to come, economists and investors foresee the fastest pace of rate increases since 1989.

78. Wall Street rallies in relief after Fed's assurance on rates -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street rallied Wednesday following the Federal Reserve's sharpest hike to interest rates since 1994, and its later assurance that such mega-hikes would not be common.

The S&P 500 climbed 54.51, or 1.5%, to 3,789.99 after whipping through roller-coaster trading immediately following the Fed's announcement. In equally topsy-turvy trading, Treasury yields eased in the bond market after Chair Jerome Powell seemed to soothe the market's fears about an overly aggressive Fed by implying more modest rate increases may be coming later this year.

79. Biggest rate hike in years expected as Fed tackles inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve is expected Wednesday to announce its largest interest rate hike since 1994 — a bigger increase than it had previously signaled and a sign that the central bank is struggling to restrain stubbornly high inflation.

80. EXPLAINER: Recession fears grow. Just how high is the risk? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation is at a 40-year high. Stock prices are sinking. The Federal Reserve is making borrowing much costlier. And the economy actually shrank in the first three months of this year.

81. Treasury bond yield inversion raises worries over recession -

NEW YORK (AP) — One of the more reliable warning signals for an economic recession is shining alarmingly brighter.

The "yield curve" is watched for clues on how the bond market feels about the long-term outlook for the U.S. economy. On Tuesday, a closely followed part of the yield curve lit up again for the second time this year.

82. Hot inflation dims likelihood Fed can achieve 'soft landing' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For months, Chair Jerome Powell has held out hope that the Federal Reserve will be able to raise interest rates high enough to throttle rampant inflation without tipping the economy into recession.

83. US inflation at new 40-year high as price increases spread -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The cost of gas, food and most other goods and services jumped in May, pushing inflation to a four-decade high and offering Americans no respite.

Consumer prices surged 8.6% last month from a year earlier, faster than April's year-over-year increase of 8.3%, the Labor Department said Friday. The new inflation figure, the biggest increase since December 1981, heightens pressure on the Federal Reserve to continue raising interest rates aggressively.

84. Worry about stagflation, a flashback to '70s, begins to grow -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Stagflation. It was the dreaded "S word" of the 1970s.

For Americans of a certain age, it conjures memories of painfully long lines at gas stations, shuttered factories and President Gerald Ford's much-ridiculed "Whip Inflation Now" buttons.

85. Yellen: inflation to 'remain high;' hopes it's 'coming down' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen acknowledged Tuesday that she and Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell "could have used a better word" than "transitory" when describing the expected run of inflation in the U.S. economy. She added that she was hopeful it would soon be on the decline.

86. Wall Street ticks higher as recession watch remains murky -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks ticked higher Monday as Wall Street keeps wrestling with whether the economy will successfully avoid a recession amid rising interest rates and high inflation. The S&P 500 edged up 0.3% and the Nasdaq rose 0.4%. Both started the day with even bigger gains, following up on strength across European and Asian markets after China relaxed some tough anti-COVID measures. But stocks fell back a bit as Treasury yields continued to climb, putting downward pressure on stocks. The yield on the 10-year Treasury, which helps set interest rates on mortgages and other loans, jumped back above 3%.

87. US job openings decline from record level but remain high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The white-hot demand for U.S. workers cooled a bit in April, though the number of unfilled jobs remains high and companies are still desperate to hire more people.

Employers advertised 11.4 million jobs at the end of April, the Labor Department said Wednesday, down from nearly 11.9 million in March, the highest level on records that date back 20 years. At that level, there are nearly two job openings for every unemployed person. That's a sharp reversal from the historic pattern: Before the pandemic, there were always more unemployed people than available jobs.

88. US consumer confidence slips in May amid stubborn inflation -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — U.S. consumer confidence edged lower in May as Americans' view of their present and future prospects dimmed in the midst of persistent inflation.

The Conference Board said Tuesday that its consumer confidence index dipped to 106.4 in May — still a strong reading — from 108.6 in April.

89. Key inflation gauge slowed to still-high 6.3% over past year -

An inflation gauge closely tracked by the Federal Reserve rose 6.3% in April from a year earlier, just below a four-decade high set in March and the first slowdown since November 2020.

Friday's report from the Commerce Department added to other recent signs showing that while high inflation continues to cause hardships for millions of households, it may finally be moderating, at least for now.

90. Worry about stagflation, a flashback to '70s, begins to grow -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Stagflation. It was the dreaded "S word" of the 1970s.

For Americans of a certain age, it conjures memories of painfully long lines at gas stations, shuttered factories and President Gerald Ford's much-ridiculed "Whip Inflation Now" buttons.

91. Fed officials signal rates may head to 'restrictive' levels -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve officials agreed when they met earlier this month that they may have to raise interest rates to levels that would weaken the economy as part of their drive to curb inflation, which is near a four-decade high.

92. Powell: 'Soft' economic landing may be out of Fed's control -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell, fresh off winning Senate confirmation for a second term earlier in the day, acknowledged for the first time Thursday that high inflation and economic weakness overseas could thwart his efforts to avoid causing a recession.

93. Fed nominee Michael Barr calls inflation 'far too high' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's pick to be the Federal Reserve's top banking regulator pledged Thursday to help reduce high inflation and provide "clear rules" to govern financial innovation.

94. Stocks fall sharply as Target's woes renew inflation fears -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Dow Jones Industrial Average sank more than 1,100 points and the S&P 500 had its biggest drop in nearly two years Wednesday, as big earnings misses by Target and other major retailers stoked investors' fears that surging inflation could cut deeply into corporate profits.

95. Biden's burdens grow: Sagging global economy adds to US woes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As President Joe Biden embarks for Asia on Thursday, he's facing a new risk at home for the economy and his Democratic Party: a global slowdown caused by Russia's invasion of Ukraine and the pandemic shutting down Chinese cities and factories.

96. Powell: Fed to keep hiking rates until it controls inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Chair Jerome Powell on Tuesday underscored the Federal Reserve's determination to keep raising interest rates until there is clear evidence inflation is steadily falling — a high-stakes effort that carries the risk of causing an eventual recession.

97. Retail sales rise 0.9% in April as consumers show resilience -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. retail sales rose 0.9% in April, a solid increase that underscores Americans' ability to keep ramping up spending even as inflation persists at nearly a 40-year high.

The increase was driven by greater sales of cars, electronics, and at restaurants, the Commerce Department said Tuesday.

98. Bitcoin tumbles, stablecoin plunges in wild week in crypto -

NEW YORK (AP) — It's been a wild week in crypto, even by crypto standards.

Bitcoin tumbled, stablecoins were anything but stable and one of the crypto industry's highest-profile companies lost a third of its market value.

99. Powell: 'Soft' economic landing may be out of Fed's control -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell, fresh off winning Senate confirmation for a second term earlier in the day, acknowledged for the first time Thursday that high inflation and economic weakness overseas could thwart his efforts to avoid causing a recession.

100. Senate confirms Powell for 2nd term as Fed fights inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate on Thursday confirmed Jerome Powell for a second four-year term as Federal Reserve chair, giving bipartisan backing to Powell's high-stakes efforts to curb the highest inflation in four decades.